City Council Passes Pride Resolution

City Council Passes Pride Resolution

City Council Passes Resolution Welcoming June as Pride Month

At the June 6, 2019 City Council meeting Council President Sabina Matos (Ward 15) and Councilwoman Rachel M. Miller (Ward 13) introduced a resolution welcoming the month of June as PRIDE month in Providence. The resolution was unanimously passed by the full council.

“Providence is a city that welcomes everyone, regardless of their gender, race, orientation, religion or how they identify,” stated City Council President Sabina Matos. “As a Catholic, I was deeply hurt by the remarks of Bishop Tobin regarding the LGBTQIA+ community, and believe that God welcomes all and stand by Mark 12:31, ‘The second {commandment} is this, ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.’”

This year marks the 50th Anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, which many consider being the catalyst that moved the gay liberation movement forward. In the early hours of June 28, 1969 Trans-women and men, gays, lesbians, and their ally’s took to the streets after continued abuse at the hands of the New York City Police in a series of riots that would propel the movement forward to where we are today.

“We can’t forget that Pride’s origin was a broad social movement for equity and inclusion. That’s especially true in today’s political climate while the LGBTQIA community is organizing to stop a national rollback on some hard-won victories,” Councilwoman Rachel M. Miller stated. “As a member of the LGBTQIA+ community, I was angered by Bishop Tobin’s recent comments but I’m proud to create an opportunity for elected officials to be on the side of love and on the side of affirming and supporting our LGBTQIA+ community.”

The first Pride march in Providence took place in 1976 when over 70 brave men and women, marched in Kennedy Plaza, after winning the right to do so after a court battle handled by the ACLU. They were taunted by police and residents alike, yet they were not deterred. Today, known as the “76’ers,” Belle Pelegrino one of the original marchers, told The Providence Journal that, “We totally expected that when we stepped into the plaza, gunfire was going to come. We thought we were going to die.”

As noted by The Washington Post, The New York Times, Time, Rolling Stone, CNN, and countless other news outlets the Trump administration has continually rolled back almost every single LGBTQIA+ protection that were put in place by previous administrations. This is why the City Council believes it is more important than ever to memorialize and codify their support for all members of our community.

Pride is celebrated around the world during the month of June, in recognition of the Stonewall Riots that took place on the morning of June 28, 1969. This year marks the 43rd Anniversary of Providence Pride which has grown from a march of 70 men and women to a weekend celebration that brings 1000’s of people to our city in celebration of equality and love.

In 2018, the City Council officially recognized the month of June as Pride Month in perpetuity and was passed by the full Council. The Providence City Council celebrates and recognizes the contributions, struggles, risks, and many identities of Providence’s LGBQIA+ community and their families and proudly affirms that love is love.

The City Council recognizes and thanks Rhode Island Pride for all they do to for the community not just on Pride weekend, but throughout the year. Pride takes place on Saturday, June 15 with Pridefest taking place along South Main Street (North from Memorial Boulevard and South Water Street to the South ending at Wickenden Street) from 12 pm – 7 pm. It will culminate in New England’s only illuminated night Pride Parade that begins at 8 pm and will travel down Dorrance Street, to Washington Street, to Empire Street and ends on Weybosset Street. This year’s theme is #LiveYourTruth.

For more information on Rhode Island Pride, please visit prideri.org.

City Council Passes Pride Resolution

2019 Property Revaluation Complete

What You Need to Know

The City of Providence announced on March 29, 2019 that the state-mandated full real estate property revaluation is complete and real estate property value assessment notices will be mailed on April 15, 2019. At this time, the following 2018 real estate revaluation procedures have been executed: Data Collection of Building Data, Building Permit Inspections, Review Analysis of Sales, Cost and Land Analysis, Income & Expense Review, Commercial Market Rate Analysis, and Table Calculations.

Providence property owners will soon receive a notice (after April 15) advising them of the new appraised value of their real estate property prior to when the new value will officially be added to the tax roll.

What You Will Receive

How To Request A Review

The notice that contains the new appraised value will also explain how to arrange for a personal informal hearing to review the proposed assessment if they so choose. Recipients are asked to follow the instructions on your notice to book an appointment with Vision Government Solutions, Inc. for a hearing on any parcel. Please bring any information to support your request for a change; hearings are by appointment only. You can make an appointment online at www.vgsi.com/schedules or by phone by calling Vision Government Solutions at 1-888-844-4300.

Hearings will begin on April 23, 2019 and end on May 17, 2019 and will be held at either the Fox Point Boys and Girls Club located at 90 Ives Street or the Neutaconkanut Recreation Center located at 675 Plainfield Street.

The Hearing Schedule is as follows:

  • Monday-Thursday from 10 AM to 6 PM
  • Friday from 10 AM to 4:30 PM
  • Saturday, April 27 and May 11 from 10 AM to 4 PM

The notices providing the results of the informal hearing will be mailed no later than May 31, 2019 with final values delivered on June 3, 2019.

Per RI General Law 44-5-11.6, cities and towns are required to perform a statistical update every third and sixth year and a full property revaluation every nine years. Vision Government Solutions uses recent sales and market data to inform their findings.

Property owners should not use the current tax rates when estimating their 2019 tax bill. Once the notices have been mailed, property owners may view their 2018 Data on the Vision Government Solutions website.

Learn more by visiting the City of Providence Tax Assessors website.

Three Providence City Councilors Introduce Resolution Opposing Monetization of Providence Water (House Bill 5390)

Providence City Councilors Rachel Miller, Seth Yurdin, and Katherine Kerwin introduced a resolution opposing the plans to privatize Providence Water and opposing the proposed state enabling legislation (House Bill 5390).

“It’s not credible that the City of Providence will somehow receive hundreds of millions of dollars today without residents, rate-payers and employees bearing the cost for future decades through higher rates, lower wages and potential water quality issues,” said Yurdin.  “It’s a false choice to pit our water supply against the city’s fiscal health.  No one disagrees that the city faces long-term financial challenges, but the water-transfer scheme is yet another one-time fix with serious long-term costs to our community,” Yurdin continued.

“To consider removing control of our water from the public hand’s in 2019, when access to affordable, quality water is a global risk, is a short-sighted proposal,” Miller said. “What we know from communities across the country, is that when private entities manage public resources like water, rates go up, quality goes down, worker protections are eroded, and the environment is threatened,” she added.

“Water monetization is being presented as the only option in a financial crisis,” Councilwoman Kerwin said. “But, our city spending priorities don’t align with the idea that we are in crisis. There are options we have not yet taken, and after hearing from countless members from my community, I feel selling water, one of our most precious assets at the expense of raising water rates, should be our last resort.”

The resolution was crafted in partnership with the Land and Water Sovereignty Campaign, a group led by Black, Indigenous, people of color, and environmental advocates. They shared the following joint statement:

“Water is an inalienable human right and shouldn’t be commodified. Monetization /privatization would negatively impact our most vulnerable communities and our environment. Over 600 cities and towns have already suffered the negative effects of monetization/ privatization. We oppose Mayor Elorza’s House Bill H5390, and we call for a moratorium of all negotiations and actions leading to monetization/privatization.”

Statement from Councilman Seth Yurdin

In the face of this heartbreaking tragedy we need to do what we can to support our community. We must strengthen our resolve to take on the underlying issues that lead to these tragic events. No child should ever have to worry about their safety at school, and tragically that is exactly what students across Providence are worried about right now. I send my deepest sympathies to William’s friends and family.

— Seth Yurdin, Councilman, Ward One

Statement from Councilman Seth Yurdin Regarding Undergraduate Student Housing

On Thursday I introduced a proposed ordinance that would amend the City’s code of ordinances to limit occupancy of housing units to not more than four undergraduate students.  This proposal’s intent was to address the serious upward pressure on housing costs resulting from certain housing units being effectively converted into dormitories or rooming house in our neighborhoods.

The four-undergraduate proposal was also designed to loosen existing city laws currently in effect prohibiting three students from occupying certain units, and to remove graduate students from the current prohibition.  I opposed the ‘three-student’ rule when it passed before the council, stating it was improper to discriminate against those choosing to seek an education.  My opposition to the three-person rule applies here to the four-person undergraduate proposal as well.  In short, my introduction of the four-undergraduate student proposal was a mistake.  A law that reduces the scope of discrimination, but still allows it to apply to others is not acceptable.

Today I submitted direction to the City Clerk to withdraw my name as sponsor of the four-undergraduate student proposal and requesting that it be withdraw from city council’s docket. I will not support it should it move forward. And I support the repeal of the current three-student rule as well.  I remain very concerned about recent developments in our neighborhoods that continue to drive up housing costs for city residents – including new student rental models and the increase of room-sharing services such as Airbnb.  I will continue to work the Council and the City’s Commission on Affordable Housing to address these challenges.  However, any solution cannot be routed in discrimination based upon the identity or status of our renters.

–Seth Yurdin, Councilman Ward One

Statement From Councilman Seth Yurdin

Today I sent a letter to Anton C. Porter, Executive Director, of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission expressing my opposition to National Grid’s proposal to the Fields Point Liquefaction Facility in the Port of Providence. I have requested Mr. Porter extend the 30-day comment period to a full 90-days allowing for more time to investigate, and if appropriate, challenge the claims and terms in the Environmental Assessment.

I stand in opposition with numerous environmental advocacy organizations and local community groups including the Sierra Club, the Environmental Justice League of Rhode Island, the Providence Student Union, and with countless residents across the state of Rhode Island.

Councilman Seth Yurdin, Ward One

6-29-18 LNG Opposition Letter (3)

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