Councilman John Goncalves Introduced a Resolution Asking the City of Providence to Recognize Nelson Mandela International Day

Councilman John Goncalves Introduced a Resolution Asking the City of Providence to Recognize Nelson Mandela International Day

Councilman John Goncalves (Ward 1) and Councilman Pedro Espinal (Ward 10) introduced a resolution at last night’s City Council Meeting calling on the City of Providence to recognize July 18 as Nelson Mandela International Day. The resolution was co-sponsored by Council President Sabina Matos (Ward 15), Majority Leader Jo-Ann Ryan (Ward 5), Majority Whip John J. Igliozzi, Esq. (Ward 7), Deputy Majority Leader Mary Kay Harris (Ward 11), Councilwoman Carmen Castillo (Ward 9), Councilor David A. Salvatore (Ward 14, Councilwoman Nirva LaFortune (Ward 3), Councilwoman Helen Anthony, Esq. (Ward 2), and Councilor Kat Kerwin (Ward 12).

“Nelson Mandela International Day was inspired by President Mandela’s call for the next generation to take on the burden of leadership in addressing the world’s social injustices when he said that ‘it is in your hands now,’ stated Councilman John Goncalves. “Nelson Mandela International Day is more than a celebration of his life and legacy, but it is a global movement to honor his life’s work and to change the world for the better. I believe that those of us in public service should heed that call and all work towards making a better tomorrow for those that come after us. From what we see happening in our own country at this very time, I believe that we can look to the work that President Mandela did and make a real change like he was able to achieve in his lifetime.”

On July 18, 2009 the United Nations declared Nelson Mandela International Day in recognition of the former President of South Africa’s dedication to the creation of a non-racial, non-sexist, and democratic South Africa.

President Mandela was a South African anti-apartheid revolutionary who was imprisoned in 1962 for conspiring to overthrow the anti-apartheid government. He was originally sentenced to life in prison but was released 27 years later. His release came after outcries from world leaders, and due to the civil unrest and the fear of a civil war. For these reasons, President F. W. de Klerk released Mandela in 1990. Together, they worked to negotiate an end to apartheid which resulted in Mr. Mandela being elected the first Black President of South Africa in 1994.

In 1994, Nelson Mandela shared this story, “A friend once asked me how I could reconcile my creed of African nationalism with a belief in dialectical materialism. For me, there was no contradiction, I was first and foremost an African nationalist fighting for our emancipation from minority rule and the right to control our own destiny. But at the same time, South Africa and the African continent were part of the larger world. Our problems, while distinctive and special, were not unique, and a philosophy that placed those problems in an international and historical context of the greater world and the course of history was valuable. I was prepared to use whatever means necessary to speed up the erasure of human prejudice and the end of chauvinistic and violent nationalism.” Time goes on, but still, President Mandela’s words ring true today as they did then.

Mandela served one term as South Africa’s President and left to become a philanthropist who focused on combating poverty and HIV/AIDS through his foundation. In 1993, upon a visit to the United Stated Mandela was awarded one of the United States’ highest honors, the Liberty Medal, by then-President Bill Clinton. The same year he and President F. W. de Klerk were joint recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize.

President Mandela was an ardent supporter of education and education for all. He once stated, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” President Mandela died at the age of 95 on December 5, 2013.

Sadly, his youngest daughter, Zindzi Mandela, died at the age of 59 on Monday, July 13, 2020. Ms. Mandela served as South Africa’s ambassador to Denmark.

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela is world renown for his values and his dedication to the service of humanity, through his work as a humanitarian in the fields of conflict resolution, race relations, promotion and protection of human rights, reconciliation, gender equality and the rights of children and other vulnerable groups, as well as the upliftment of the poor and underdeveloped communities.

“Tomorrow around the world there will be celebrations honoring the extraordinary life and enduring legacy of President Mandela. Let us take a moment here in Providence, especially with all of the division in our world, to come together in unity and solidarity, to reflect and follow in Mandela’s footsteps in advocating for a more peaceful, sustainable and equitable city for all,” stated Councilman John Goncalves.

City Councilors Call on the City of Providence to  Transform into an Anti-Racist Institution

City Councilors Call on the City of Providence to Transform into an Anti-Racist Institution

By investing and supporting in structures, programs, and policies that align with the
Just Providence Framework and the City’s Climate Justice Plan

Councilwomen Helen Anthony (Ward 2) and Nirva LaFortune (Ward 3), along with co-sponsors Councilors Rachel Miller (Ward 13), Kat Kerwin (Ward 12), John Goncalves (Ward 1), Pedro Espinal (Ward 10), Council President Sabina Matos (Ward 15), Majority Leader Jo-Ann Ryan (Ward 5), Deputy Majority Leader Mary Kay Harris (Ward 11), Councilwoman Carmen Castillo (Ward 9), and Councilor David A. Salvatore (Ward 14) introduced a resolution at tonight’s City Council meeting calling on the City of Providence to commit to developing an anti-racist institution that prioritizes investment and support structures, that align with the Just Providence Framework and the City’s Climate Justice Plan.

“Climate change impacts our marginalized communities disproportionately, stated Councilor Helen Anthony. The City’s Office of Sustainability in partnership with the Racial and Environmental Justice Committee have done an excellent job creating a plan that addresses the interconnected issues of public health, racism, climate, and environmental sustainability.”

The resolution points out specific markers in history where city leaders repeatedly failed residents of color. Black and Indigenous communities were displaced to build industrial sites, highways, and roads. Schools that serve predominantly students of color lack resources; schools –

Councilwoman Nirva LaFortune stated, “We can not build a just and equitable society without addressing the impacts of climate change on our most vulnerable community members. The Office of Sustainability and the Racial and Environmental committee are committed to working with the community to ensure that climate and sustainability plans recognize the intersection of race and class as an indicator in Environmental Justice assessments. Tonight’s resolution is a  movement seeking to rectify policies and structures that failed to acknowledge Black, indigenous and communities of color in climate and other environmental-related initiatives. It is up to all of us to  work together to make sustainability and environmental justice a guiding principle in addressing climate change.”

“The Climate Justice Plan is recognized as a national leader and model for community-centered planning, power-shifting, and climate justice. The Office of Sustainability is being tasked with updating existing policies such as zoning, developing new programs such as ‘Green Justice Zones’ in our frontline communities, and creating new policies to help mitigate the climate crisis we are facing, especially in these frontline communities where the crisis is only exacerbating health and economic inequities. As elected officials, it is incumbent on us to support them in this much-needed endeavor,” stated Councilor Rachel Miller.

Tonight’s resolution calls on the City to commit to transforming to an anti-racist institution by following the “Continuum on Becoming an Anti-Racist Multicultural Organization,” to support and invest in structures, programs, and policies that align with the Justice Providence Framework and the Climate Justice Plan.

Councilor Kat Kerwin shared, “Further, this resolution requests that the Office of Sustainability be supported in the FY21 budget so that it may improve the lives of Providence’s BIPOC communities. And that they can continue their work to mitigate long-term climate threats and reduce the loss of life with solutions that result in clean air and water, climate-resistant low-income housing, community health initiatives, environmental justice, youth programs, and economic justice.”

“The time for us to act is now,” stated Councilman John Goncalves. “Our futures depend on the resiliency that we cultivate today so that we may grow a brighter tomorrow for the next generation of all Providence residents. The interconnectedness of climate justice, housing, and economic prosperity for all is dependent on us working together today to address and mitigate the social issues that are caused by an ever-changing climate.”

Finally, the resolution also requests that the City follow the Spectrum of Community Engagement to Ownership outlined in the Climate Justice Plan and move towards a collaborative governance decision-making process that centers those who are most impacted by the current health, environment, and economic crises.

“Our residents and our future residents deserve nothing less,” stated Councilman Pedro Espinal. “The time is now for us to take action, and I believe that we can change the trajectory of our collective history by working together.”

Council President Matos Calls on the Department of Planning and Development Promulgate Rules Regarding Administrative Tax Stabilization Agreements

Council President Matos Calls on the Department of Planning and Development Promulgate Rules Regarding Administrative Tax Stabilization Agreements

Providence City Council President Sabina Matos (Ward 15), and co-sponsors Majority Leader Jo-Ann Ryan (Ward 5), Majority Whip John J. Igliozzi, Esq. (Ward 7), Deputy Majority Leader Mary Kay Harris (Ward 11), Councilor David A. Salvatore (Ward 14), and Councilman John Goncalves (Ward 1) introduced a resolution tonight calling on the Department of Planning and Development to promulgate strict rules around employment and contracts relating to the I-195 Tax Stabilization Agreement (TSA).

“The requirements outlined in our TSAs impose specific employment criteria that developers must adhere to in exchange for being provided an incentivized tax structure,” stated City Council President Matos. “Providence needs to ensure that we are putting our residents to work and that we are developing our own local economy. When developers ask to be exempt from these requirements, they are seeking to receive special tax benefits without having to make a meaningful contribution to the residents of this City.”

Section 21-266 of the Code of Ordinances defines strict employment standards that all developers must abide by should they wish to obtain a TSA within the City. These employment standards include dedicating at least 10% of the construction costs for Minority (MBEs) and Women-owned Businesses (WBEs), as well as ensuring that 100% of the construction hours worked on the project are done by contractors who have or are affiliated with an apprenticeship program. The Code of Ordinances currently provides the Director of Planning with authority to reduce these employment requirements should a Developer petition the Director to do so. President Matos’ resolution is aimed directly at these petitions for relief by asking the Director of Planning to promulgate strict and specific rules regarding how petitions will be evaluated moving forward.

President Matos continued, “All too often we hear stories of our local MBEs and WBEs being overlooked by contractors and developers. We are a city on the proverbial financial cliff, our residents need to work, and making it harder for developers and owners to no longer be able to get around these requirements will go a long way to keeping our residents working, and ensuring that our city continues to grow forward.”

The resolution will require the Director of the Department of Planning and Development to create strict rules and regulations governing the procedure by which petitioners for relief of Section 21-261 are vetted and approved.

Councilor David A. Salvatore Introduces an Amendment to the Code of Ordinance to Set Street Sweeping and Sidewalk Sweeping Schedule for the City of Providence

Councilor David A. Salvatore Introduces an Amendment to the Code of Ordinance to Set Street Sweeping and Sidewalk Sweeping Schedule for the City of Providence

At tonight’s City Council meeting, Councilor David A. Salvatore (Ward 14) introduced an amendment to the Code of Ordinance, along with co-sponsors President Pro Tempore Michael Correia (Ward 6), Councilman Pedro Espinal (Ward 10), Councilwoman Nirva LaFortune (Ward 3), and Councilman John Goncalves (Ward 1), that would set forth a designated schedule for street and sidewalk sweeping in the City of Providence. Currently, there is no ordinance that creates a predictable plan to ensure that these vital qualities of life issues are handled in a timely matter.

“Over the past several weeks, I have made observations of the state of our streets and sidewalks in Providence, and my findings are disturbing. Our City needs a higher level of cleanliness,” stated Councilor David A. Salvatore. Currently, there is nothing in our City’s Code of Ordinances that spells out a street and sidewalk sweeping program. This amendment would ensure that our streets and sidewalks are swept on a regular and predictable basis while enhancing communication with city residents.”

The amendment would require the Department of Public Works (DPW) to sweep every street within the City at a minimum of six times per year. The DPW director will also be directed to maintain a street sweeping calendar that identifies a recurring schedule of when each street will be swept. Like other municipalities, the DPW will be required to notify residents with overnight parking permits using best practices from other cities including signage and other forms of direct notification in addition to PVD 311.

DPW will be also be required to sweep sidewalks along all principal arterials, minor arterials, major collectors, and minor collectors as classified by the State of Rhode Island Division of Statewide Planning within the City at a minimum of three times per year.

“Local governments promise a social contract with its residents to make certain that their quality of life is upheld. Unfortunately, Providence has portrayed itself as a dirty city, which jeopardizes the environment, homeownership growth, and expanding our tax base,” reiterated Councilor Salvatore. “Our residents and businesses deserve to have clean streets and sidewalks, and it is my hope that my amendment will fix this decades-old issue.”

The amendment to the Code of Ordinances will be sent to the Committee on Ordinances for vetting and consideration.

Councilor David A. Salvatore Introduces an Amendment to the Code of Ordinance to Set Street Sweeping and Sidewalk Sweeping Schedule for the City of Providence

Statement from Councilor David A. Salvatore Honoring Rev. Brian J. Shanley, O.P. for his Honorable Service as President of Providence College

Tonight, I will be introducing a resolution to recognize Rev. Brian J. Shanley, O.P. for his honorable service as the President of Providence College. Rev. Shanley is the longest-serving president in the 100-year history of Providence College and is also the only Rhode Island native to ever serve as president.

On June 30, 2020, Father Shanley’s tenure as president of Providence College ended following fifteen years of guiding the school through a period of remarkable change and growth.

Under Father Shanley’s presidency, the College built upon its proud heritage as a Catholic, liberal arts institution, sustained its commitment to its ideals, and modified both practices and facilities in ways that have enhanced its national profile. As a result, Providence College created a sustainable platform for long-term success.

Father Shanley has overseen a substantial transformation of the Providence College campus including the additions of the Ruane Center for the Humanities, the Arthur F. and Patricia Ryan Center for Business Studies, and the Ruane Friar Development Center, as well as a completely re-envisioned model for pedestrian and vehicular movement around the campus.

Father Shanley made diversity a high priority of his administration. Establishing the advancement of diversity as one of the core values of both Providence College’s 2011 Strategic Plan and its 2018 successor plan was crucial to growth. The plans resulted in the percentage of undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds almost tripling (to approximately 20 percent of the student body population) since 2005, and the percentage of diverse full-time faculty has risen from eight percent to 17 percent over the same time period.

Providence College is one of the ten largest employers within the City of Providence and a major driver of the local economy. As a result of Father Shanley’s leadership, the College maintained a strong commitment to the City through more than 55,000 hours of student community service assisting over 150 different social service agencies, community groups, public, private and charter schools, and city government offices.

I wish to extend my deepest gratitude and thanks to Rev. Brian J. Shanley, O.P. for his dedicated service to the residents of the City of Providence through his 15 years serving as the President of Providence College and I wish him well on this next chapter.

David A. Salvatore
Providence City Council
Councilor – Ward 14

Councilor David A. Salvatore Introduces an Amendment to the Code of Ordinance to Set Street Sweeping and Sidewalk Sweeping Schedule for the City of Providence

Statement from Councilman David Salvatore Regarding the Recent Act of Vandalism at Providence College

What occurred at Providence College was disgraceful.

Providence College’s campus provides our community with many benefits including green space and access to community programs; and to see their campus desecrated with symbols of hate is harmful and traumatic.

I am glad the vandal has been apprehended, and it is my sincere hope that he is able to access the help that he needs.

My family and I are wishing the security officer who was assaulted a speedy recovery.

David A. Salvatore
Providence City Council
Councilman – Ward 14

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