Ward 14

Councilman David A. Salvatore

Councilman David Salvatore has been a member of the Providence City Council since 2010. He represents the neighborhoods Elmhurst and Wanskuck neighborhoods. Councilman Salvatore has been a strong advocate of financial and pension reform in the city. As the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Pension Sustainability during his first term, he oversaw the drafting of a report that made recommendations designed to stabilize the pension system and reduce the system’s unfunded liability.

READ HIS FULL BIO HERE >

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Ward 14: Elmhurst and Wanskuck

Covering the neighborhoods of Elmhurst & Wanskuck, Ward 14 is located on the northwestern quadrant of the city. Here you'll find Providence College, La Salle Academy, and the ever-popular LaSalle Bakery. The Wanskuck Historic District was once the location of a thriving mill village built along the West River. The mills have since closed but many of the buildings are still there, located, including The Wanskuck Public Library. This historic building is located on Veazie Street. The current building replaced the original library that was built by the Wanskuck Mill Company for it's workers. Though the mill is closed, the library is still a going concern. In 1983, the historic district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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Providence City Council Calls on State to Ban Assault Weapons

City Council members passed three resolutions at tonight’s council meeting urging the General Assembly to pass legislation banning assault weapons, banning high capacity magazines, and prohibiting concealed-carry weapons on school grounds. These resolutions were introduced by Councilwoman Nirva LaFortune (Ward 3), Councilman David A. Salvatore (Ward 14), Councilwoman Helen Anthony (Ward 2), Councilwoman Rachel Miller (Ward 13), and Councilman Seth Yurdin (Ward 1).

“We are not going to wait until the next tragedy for changes that we need to see enacted now,” stated Councilwoman Nirva LaFortune. “It is time to take a stand against gun violence and the City Council supports the Senators and Representatives that have put forth this much-needed legislation. We need to keep assault weapons off the street and away from criminals in order to ensure the safety of families, students, and law enforcement officers.”

The Providence City Council respectfully requests the Rhode Island General Assembly to pass House Bills H-5741, H-5762, H-5739; and Senate Bills S-635, S-636, S-637. These legislative bills include the Rhode Island Assault Weapons Ban Act, the Large Capacity Feeding Device Ban Act and an amendment to the RI General Law chapter 11-47 entitled “weapons.” Seven States and the District of Columbia have enacted laws banning Assault weapons including: California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York.

Councilman David A. Salvatore stated, “The debate is over; there is no justification for military-style assault weapons with large-capacity magazines to be in the hands of civilians. Firearms should be nowhere near our school grounds or public spaces and it is our moral obligation as public servants to protect the people through common sense gun legislation. Rhode Islanders will not let the proliferation of assault weapons go unchecked.”

“This is a clear message from Providence residents to our state leaders that it is time to put an end to mass shootings by banning assault weapons once and for all,” stated Councilwoman Helen Anthony. “Our children deserve a safer world and not one where anybody can easily acquire a weapon that shoots up to 100 rounds a minute.”

Click here to view a digital version of the resolutions.

City Council Passes Pride Resolution

City Council Passes Resolution Welcoming June as Pride Month

At the June 6, 2019 City Council meeting Council President Sabina Matos (Ward 15) and Councilwoman Rachel M. Miller (Ward 13) introduced a resolution welcoming the month of June as PRIDE month in Providence. The resolution was unanimously passed by the full council.

“Providence is a city that welcomes everyone, regardless of their gender, race, orientation, religion or how they identify,” stated City Council President Sabina Matos. “As a Catholic, I was deeply hurt by the remarks of Bishop Tobin regarding the LGBTQIA+ community, and believe that God welcomes all and stand by Mark 12:31, ‘The second {commandment} is this, ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.’”

This year marks the 50th Anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, which many consider being the catalyst that moved the gay liberation movement forward. In the early hours of June 28, 1969 Trans-women and men, gays, lesbians, and their ally’s took to the streets after continued abuse at the hands of the New York City Police in a series of riots that would propel the movement forward to where we are today.

“We can’t forget that Pride’s origin was a broad social movement for equity and inclusion. That’s especially true in today’s political climate while the LGBTQIA community is organizing to stop a national rollback on some hard-won victories,” Councilwoman Rachel M. Miller stated. “As a member of the LGBTQIA+ community, I was angered by Bishop Tobin’s recent comments but I’m proud to create an opportunity for elected officials to be on the side of love and on the side of affirming and supporting our LGBTQIA+ community.”

The first Pride march in Providence took place in 1976 when over 70 brave men and women, marched in Kennedy Plaza, after winning the right to do so after a court battle handled by the ACLU. They were taunted by police and residents alike, yet they were not deterred. Today, known as the “76’ers,” Belle Pelegrino one of the original marchers, told The Providence Journal that, “We totally expected that when we stepped into the plaza, gunfire was going to come. We thought we were going to die.”

As noted by The Washington Post, The New York Times, Time, Rolling Stone, CNN, and countless other news outlets the Trump administration has continually rolled back almost every single LGBTQIA+ protection that were put in place by previous administrations. This is why the City Council believes it is more important than ever to memorialize and codify their support for all members of our community.

Pride is celebrated around the world during the month of June, in recognition of the Stonewall Riots that took place on the morning of June 28, 1969. This year marks the 43rd Anniversary of Providence Pride which has grown from a march of 70 men and women to a weekend celebration that brings 1000’s of people to our city in celebration of equality and love.

In 2018, the City Council officially recognized the month of June as Pride Month in perpetuity and was passed by the full Council. The Providence City Council celebrates and recognizes the contributions, struggles, risks, and many identities of Providence’s LGBQIA+ community and their families and proudly affirms that love is love.

The City Council recognizes and thanks Rhode Island Pride for all they do to for the community not just on Pride weekend, but throughout the year. Pride takes place on Saturday, June 15 with Pridefest taking place along South Main Street (North from Memorial Boulevard and South Water Street to the South ending at Wickenden Street) from 12 pm – 7 pm. It will culminate in New England’s only illuminated night Pride Parade that begins at 8 pm and will travel down Dorrance Street, to Washington Street, to Empire Street and ends on Weybosset Street. This year’s theme is #LiveYourTruth.

For more information on Rhode Island Pride, please visit prideri.org.

Salvatore Reintroduces Fair Housing Ordinance

Councilman David A. Salvatore Reintroduces Fair Housing Ordinance for Older Adults and Disabled Persons

City Councilman David A. Salvatore (Ward 14) reintroduced an ordinance at tonight’s Council Meeting that ensures security measures are being implemented in housing developments where older adults and disabled persons reside.
“We cannot neglect our senior citizens who deserve to live in a safe environment, with dignity and respect,” stated Councilman David Salvatore. “Late in 2018, I visited a housing development for low-income persons with disabilities along with Police Chief Hugh Clements. We were both puzzled and deeply concerned by the lack of security on the premises. After our meeting with the residents and after hearing of several incidents of elderly abuse, I researched best practices and came across Boston’s 1989 Senior Security Ordinance that has proved effective at keeping vulnerable residents safe. What I am proposing ensures our seniors and people with disabilities are provided with the protections they deserve.”
“As public safety officials, it is our job to make certain that the citizens of Providence maintain the best possible quality of life,” said Colonel Clements. “This ordinance will assist police in their ongoing efforts to protect these vulnerable members of our community, who do not deserve to live in fear. The Providence Police Department is in full support of this ordinance to ensure the safety and security of our disabled and elderly residents.”
According to the proposed ordinance, every landlord that holds title to any elderly/disabled multi-family housing development will be required to provide a safety officer or submit for approval a security plan that meets the security needs of residents. All tenants will be notified and allowed input during the approval process of the plan. Seniors who reside in multi-family housing developments will also be protected from rent increases as a result of landlords complying with the new security requirements outlined in the ordinance. To obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance, please visit the Open Meetings Portal.

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